The Diaries of a Sozzled Scribbler #18

The Diaries of a Sozzled Scribbler #18

Transcribed by DMETRI KAKMI

1 October 2020

My amanuensis Derwent Klopovicki has a new book and he insists I interview him. Said he’d leave my employ if I didn’t, and to be honest it’s hard to find a good dog’s body nowadays. So here goes nothing.

SS: So Dolphin, I can’t wait to hear about your new book. Tell us about it. (Yawns extravagantly.)

DK: My name’s Dmetri actually.

SS: Dmetri Actually. That’s a funny name. Are you going to tell us about your new book or am I going off to masturbate?

DK: I’m surprised you can get it up at your age.

SS: Flattery will get you nowhere. Tell us about The Boor.

DK: It’s called The Door and Other Uncanny Tales, and it’s collection of two gothic novellas and four short stories. It’s published by the US based NineStar Press and it’s available online and in bricks and mortar bookstores.

SS: Is that all?

DK: What do you mean is that all?

SS: How long has it been since your first book came out—was it called Motherfucker?

DK: Mother Land was released in 2008. It’s a memoir—

SS: Over a decade ago and you only produced six measly stories in that time. You must be one of those lazy Greeks who lie on Mediterranean beaches, diddling goats when you should be working.

DK: When wit fails resort to national stereotypes and cliches.

SS: Why not? Greeks are a bunch of sybarites. No wonder the country is going down the gurgler. Had their day 2000 years ago, done fuck all since. They should have became Turks. At least the Turks know the meaning of hard work. And wiping out ethnic and religious minorities. But that’s another story.

DK: Please, what do you know about work?

SS: Excuse me, I did a bit of work … once. In 1921. It was exhausting. Still recovering.

DK: Can we get back to the topic at hand?

SS: Everything isn’t about you, Dolores.

DK: In this instance, it is. Ask a question about The Door.

SS: Now let me see… (Scratches head.)

DK: Did you read it?

SS: I wasted no time in reading your fascinating little tome.

DK: That means no. And the name is Dmetri. Not Dolores.

SS: That’s what I said, Dracula. So why do you write spooky stories?

DK: I prefer the term gothic. I don’t set out to scare people when I write.

SS: No, they just have to look at your face for that. (Laughs.)

DK: With these psychological ghost stories, I’m interested in destabilizing the reader and making them question the nature of perception and reality. Is fantasy another kind of reality?

SS: It is for drag queens.

DK: For me the stories in this book are dark fairy tales for adults. They take us into subterranean aspects of human nature.

SS: Talking about fairies, you’re one of those homosexualists, aren’t you?

DK: That’s a quaint term. Nowadays we say ‘queer’ or ‘gay’.

SS: Are you a gay writer? Is this a gay book?

DK: No and no. That’s what I’m trying to say, if you’d listen for a moment, instead of interrupting.

SS: Yes, yes, hurry up. It’s almost martini o’clock and I’m getting bored.

DK: What is a gay writer? What constitutes a gay book? Last time I looked books didn’t have genitalia or sexual proclivities.

SS: But you do.

DK: I am a writer and this is a book. That’s all that needs to be said about it. The only criteria should be quality. We don’t classify books by heterosexual authors as ‘straight books’ and ‘straight literature’. Why do it to homosexuals, or people from different ethnic backgrounds? I find terminology like this reductive. Why categorize and box an artist? We should be widening the scope, not narrowing it.

SS: If I wanted a lecture I would have asked for one. Geez, sensitive or what?

DK: As some booksellers have noted, only two stories in my book have openly gay male characters. The rest have heterosexual female protagonists or children of both sexes.

SS: Me thinks you protest too much, Diego.

DK: I just don’t want to be limited, as a person and as a writer. I’m in favor of plurality, pulling in diverse experience, rather than excluding.

SS: You’d be a complete failure with the cultural appropriation crew.

DK: Don’t get me started on that. The protagonist in Haunting Matilda is a little girl and her rescuer is an Australian Indigenous woman. The Long Lonely Road is set on the Turkish island where I was born and the protagonist is a Muslim boy—

SS: Does he blow himself up on a crowded bus?

DK: I wish you’d blow up. The Long Lonely Roadis based on an urban myth I grew up hearing when I was a child in Turkey. In reinterpreting it, I draw on two different sources from my own background: Greek myth and Middle Eastern religion and fable. The main novella, The Door, and its prequel, In The Dark, uses Aeschylus’s Oresteia as a leaping-off point but it’d set in urban Melbourne.

SS: Is he your uncle?

DK: Who?

SS: Aeschylus.

DK: No, you idiot, he was an ancient Greek tragedian. The point is that these are not typical genre pieces. I bring a different perspective to the conversation. One I hope readers will appreciate.

SS: What does the future look like for Demarera Kleptomania?

DK: I finished a gothic fantasy novel set in central Australia. That’s with a publisher at the moment.

SS: Reject!

DK: I’m writing a crime novel now…

SS: Reject!

DK: …and of course you and I will start work on your memoirs soon.

SS: Bestseller!

À bientôt, mes amies.


The Sozzled Scribbler was born in the shadow of the Erechtheion in Athens, Greece, to an Egyptian street walker (his father) and a Greek bear wrestler (his mother). He has lived in Istanbul, Rome, London, New Orleans and is currently stateless. He partakes of four bottles of Bombay gin and nine packets of Gauloises cigarettes a day.

Dmetri Kakmi is a writer and editor. His first book, Mother Land, was shortlisted for the New South Wales Premiers Literary Awards in Australia, and his new book, The Door, will be released in September 2020.

Comics Are Trying to Break Your Heart #90: The Spooks Begin Now

Comics Are Trying to Break Your Heart #90 by Drew Barth

The Spooks Begin Now

There’s good horror comics out there right now—namely work like Something is Killing the Children and The Low, Low Woods—but it’s always good to see a new one beginning so close to Halloween. This year, we have one of Vault Comics’ newest series to terrify. Daniel Kraus, Chris Shehan, Jason Wordie, and Jim Campbell come together for The Autumnal, a series already steeped in atmospheric dread and we’re only one issue in.

The first issue of The Autumnal begins with one of my favorite horror tropes: a dying relative leaving a house for the down-on-their-luck protagonist. This works so well since the protagonist is always reluctant—they’re entering into an unknown town and into an unknown house. The Autumnal plays with this trope in a fun way as our protagonist, Kat Somerville, isn’t going into an unknown town or house and she’s not doing so reluctantly. Trudy, Kat’s mother, has left for her her childhood home in her childhood town after years of not speaking to one another. And Kat is already on the way out of her current apartment due to late rent and her daughter, Sybil, having some issues at school. This should be Kat’s ticket out of her old life and into something potentially more stable in the town of Comfort Notch, and yet foreboding kicks in hard.

The Autumnal creates at continuous feeling of dread thanks in large part to the colors of Jason Wordie. The book looks like a bruise—the deep purples and greens building up a sense of unease and darkness through every page. Kat’s world looks as though it’s been through the worst and these colors reflect that—from her home to Sybil’s school to the bus ride out of town. But this all ends with the splash-page whiplash of Kat and Sybil entering Comfort Notch for the first time and seeing the palette explode into fall foliage and blue skies, a moment to catch your breath after pages of quiet discomfort.

What makes The Autumnal so interesting as a horror series is the way it builds its unease and its dread. This is a bloodless issue—no gore, no loss of limbs. And yet there is a terror building in the background, something Kat can’t see right away but can hear in children’s rhymes she hasn’t thought about since she was nine. This is the kind of terror that is going to burn slowly.

Get excited. Get spooked.


Drew Barth (Episode 331) is a writer residing in Winter Park, FL. He received his MFA from the University of Central Florida. Right now, he’s worrying about his cat.

Episode 439: Chuck Palahniuk!

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Episode 439 of The Drunken Odyssey, your favorite podcast about creative writing and literature is available on Apple podcastsstitcher, spotify, or click here to stream (right click to download, if that’s your thing).

On this week’s show, I talk to novelist Chuck Palahniuk about The Invention of Sound, Consider This: Moments in My Writing Life after Which Everything Was Different, Adjustment Day, the 18-month rule, how to stay productive, how to keep invested in the work, the genius of Ira Levin, the value of mentors, and how to remix Invisible Monsters.

TEXTS DISCUSSED

NOTESScribophile

TDO Listeners can get 20% of a premium subscription to Scribophile. After using the above link to register for a basic account, go here while still logged in to upgrade the account with the discount.

Check out Episode 332, when Vanessa Blakeslee and I discussed Chuck’s Stranger Than Fiction.

Check out my literary adventure novel, Guy Psycho and the Ziggurat of Shame.


Episode 439 of The Drunken Odyssey, your favorite podcast about creative writing and literature is available on Apple podcastsstitcher, spotify, or click here to stream (right click to download, if that’s your thing).

The Curator of Schlock #325: Blood Feast

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The Curator of Schlock #325 by Jeff Shuster

Blood Feast

Herschell Gordon Lewis. The man. The myth. The Legend. 

The food has been off in this place ever since Jervis made those sloppy Joes. He said it was a special ground meat blend, but I’ve never tasted meat like that in my life. And I never noticed any authorities showing up to retrieve Indigo’s body. When I sleep at night, it feels like someone is in the room with me, watching me. Sometimes I want to get in my car and hightail it, but then I remember I abandoned my car in the Florida Everglades.

schlock mansion

Tonight’s movie is 1963’s Blood Feast from director Herschell Gordon Lewis. This is a wet one, folks. I don’t know. I guess one director got fed up with all the restrictions imposed by the Hays Code and went hog wild. Apparently, vomit bags were provided to theater goers at screenings. Oh, and Lewis wrote a novelization to coincide with the release of the movie should any of you readerly types want to seek it out.

Blood Feast begins with a suburban housewife listening to a Miami news report about how there’s a homicidal maniac on the loose. The reporter says that women should not go out alone at night. Good thing the housewife is staying in for a bath and not going outside, right? Not really because the killer breaks into her house and kills her in the bath by stabbing her in the eye. The killer then severs and bags up her leg before he leaves.

This is sick movie! I don’t want to watch body parts being hacked off in full color. Maybe it’s the fact that this movie was made in the early 60s which is throwing off my sensibilities. I expect this crap from my 70s movies and not during a time when Americans were clean cut and respectable. We get two inept police detectives who don’t really get any closer to solving this case with each gruesome murder.

The guy going around murdering women is named Fuad Ramses (Mal Arnold). He runs a local grocery store and has written a book on bizarre Egyptian cults of the ancient world. One such cult worshipped the goddess Ishtar and that worshipping demanded the preparation of a “blood feast.” Basically, it’s just an excuse for cannibalism. And he’s preparing this blood feast at a party hosted by, naturally, wealthy socialite Dorothy Fremont.

I guess Fuad has to get different body parts from different women. He’ll get a brain from one and a heart from another. One vicious attack revolved around him removing a woman’s tongue, and we get to watch her bleed to death. I can only think such feats had never been attempted before on film. And maybe they should never have been attempted again.

That’s all I got to say about Blood Feast. I’m sure that in a couple of years I’ll have worse judgement and will fervently recommend this film to friends and family.

To my future self, please don’t.

That’s all for now.


Photo by Leslie Salas.

Jeff Shuster (episode 47, episode 102, episode 124, episode 131, and episode 284) is an MFA graduate from the University of Central Florida.

Comics Are Trying to Break Your Heart #89: A Legacy in Ink

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Comics Are Trying to Break Your Heart #89 by Drew Barth

A Legacy in Ink

Like a Kirby comic, you know exactly when you pick up a Kubert comic: direct storytelling and an expansive setting. These two qualities have become so ingrained in the language of comics since the 70s that it’s no wonder that The Kubert School exists as a location to be trained in comics and illustration. Joe Kubert began this style, Andy and Adam Kubert continued, and now Emma Kubert and Rusty Gladd build upon this legacy with their new series from Image, Inkblot.

Inkblot#1 establishes itself as a modern take on classic comic fantasy from the 60s and 70s. Steeped in the tradition of magic, mystery, and realms that hearken back to Norse mythology, Inkblot also seems modern, thanks to a magical cat who brings ennui and mischief in a way only an internet saturated audience can really appreciate. The cat magically appears and causes chaos, much like my own cat. The story centers on The Seeker, the unnamed sibling of the founders of magic, who chronicles her family’s adventures through the seven realms. When a bundle of spells and a pot of ink are knocked off her table, a little cat of magic and ink is born, immediately ripping up papers and opening portals in The Seeker’s library.

All of these older fantasy trappings make Inkblot such a fun comic compared to some contemporary fantasy series. Kubert and Gladd are bursting with story throughout this sprint of a twenty-page first issue. But they know not to try to jam as much as possible in the beginning—they give themselves the room to keep expanding while dropping bits of world building and story in off-hand moments of dialogue. Our main character only briefly mentions that she’s thousands of years old and the information is told in passing in such a way that I’m now waiting for the later arc explaining how her and her siblings have become living gods of magic.

I haven’t been this excited for a fantasy comic since DIE last year.

Inkblotis a piece of a wider, generational comic legacy. Emma Kubert builds from the work of her grandfather and expands on it.

Get excited. Get that cat.


Drew Barth (Episode 331) is a writer residing in Winter Park, FL. He received his MFA from the University of Central Florida. Right now, he’s worrying about his cat.

Episode 438: A Discussion of Children of Men, with Michael Wheaton!

Episode 438 of The Drunken Odyssey, your favorite podcast about creative writing and literature is available on Apple podcastsstitcher, spotify, or click here to stream (right click to download, if that’s your thing).

On this episode, I talk to writer Michael Wheaton about Alfonso Cuaron’s 2006 film, Children of Men, while I wait in vain for my ears to stop ringing.

TEXTS DISCUSSED

NOTES

Scribophile

TDO Listeners can get 20% of a premium subscription to Scribophile. After using the above link to register for a basic account, go here while still logged in to upgrade the account with the discount.

Check out my literary adventure novel, Guy Psycho and the Ziggurat of Shame.


Episode 438 of The Drunken Odyssey, your favorite podcast about creative writing and literature is available on Apple podcastsstitcher, spotify, or click here to stream (right click to download, if that’s your thing).

The Curator of Schlock #324: Bloody Birthday

The Curator of Schlock $324 by Jeff Shuster

Bloody Birthday

Bad Seed times three. 

Indigo didn’t show up for our Thursday night checkers game. My housemate was nowhere to be found. I started searching the property and found his dead body tucked behind the tool shed. Too puncture marks were on his neck and I can’t help, but think that it must have been some kind of animal attack. Maybe one of those Florida panthers got him. Jervis said he’d contact the authorities and they’d take care of the body. Creepy business. Maybe I should make plans to leave, but Jervis is making Sloppy Joes this weekend. I love me some Sloppy Joes.

schlock mansion

But what I don’t like is children. Yeah, I didn’t like children when I was a child and I certainly don’t like them now that I’m a man of distinction. Children are the main focus of tonight’s feature film, 1981’s Bloody Birthday from director Ed Hunt. The movie begins with three children being delivered at a hospital during a solar eclipse, two boys and a girl. And I guess if your born right at the point of an eclipse, you’re a bad seed.

Fast forward ten years and we have a trio of miserable ten-year-olds whose idea of fun is murdering people and getting away with it. These are Debbie (Elizabeth Hoy), a blonde girl, Steven (Andy Freeman), a blond boy, and Curtis (Billy Jayne), a four-eyed little shit that I want to smack every time I see him on screen. They’re all little shits and I can only think that getting killed by them would be one of the humiliating experiences imaginable. If I have to go, let me die by that hands of a Cropsy or a Michael Myers, not this trio of despicable brats!

Their first victims are a couple of horny teenagers who thought it was a good idea to make out in an open grave. The adolescent girl gets strangled with a jump rope and the adolescent boy gets his head bashed in with a shovel. Then the children throw dirt over the grave. This doesn’t stop the town Sheriff from uncovering the bodies and determining that a killer is on the loose. And wouldn’t you know it, Sheriff Brody is Debbie’s dad.

This doesn’t stop our little Debbie from orchestrating the demise of her own father. She leaves a skateboard on the back steps to her house, but her dad just steps over it. That’s okay since Steven is at the ready to bash his brains in with a baseball bat. Curtis also gets in on the murder game by using the Sheriff’s revolver on his super strict grammar school teacher, Ms. Davis (Susan Strasberg). You see, young Curtis had a replica of a revolver that he switched out for the real thing.

The heroine of this movie is Joyce Russell (Lori Lethin), a high school senior with aspirations of becoming an investigative reporter. I think she first becomes suspicious of the bad seeds when Curtis and Stephen lock her younger brother, Timmy (K. C. Martel), in an old refrigerator at the junkyard. A night of babysitting gone to hell removes all shadow of a doubt that these kids are killers, but Joyce doesn’t kill them. She manages to subdue them in time for cops to arrive. What a disappointment. I was hoping to see Curtis get decapitated or set on fire. I wonder if there was a sequel.


Photo by Leslie Salas.

Jeff Shuster (episode 47, episode 102, episode 124, episode 131, and episode 284) is an MFA graduate from the University of Central Florida.

 

Comics Are Trying to Break Your Heart #87: Looking At What’s There

Comics Are Trying to Break Your Heart #87 by Drew Barth

Looking At What’s There

Abstraction is one of the key components of comics. Nothing we see on the page is real—we only ever see a representation of reality through an artist interpreting it. Comics are interesting since they can play with this abstraction and interpretation in ways many other visual mediums cannot. Seeing abstraction done well, however, is still rather rare. That’s why it’s refreshing to see works like Creation by Sylvia Nickerson and Cowboyby Rikke Villadsen. What these two creators do is work with the abstract in multiple ways—either with a new mother watching a city slowly being swallowed by gentrification or with the absurdity of cowboy masculinity.

What both comics do so well, though, is work with the idea of abstraction to almost absurd degrees. With Creation, Nickerson rarely draws detailed people. Instead, she opts for outlines of people that interact with beautifully laid out backgrounds and environments. What matters throughout her story of her and her newly born son is their environment—how they interact with and move through it. Creation presents us with the idea of the act of creation in the city of Hamilton, a place filled with toxic waste and smog, while working with the creation of human life. It is in the way Nickerson presents herself and her son as these abstract outlines that makes for a closer, more personal look at trying to create in a place that is slowly losing itself. We always see Nickerson as herself, but we can see just a little more of ourselves as well.

Rikke Villadsen’s Cowboy, on the other hand, works in a different kind of abstraction. While our characters all have names and faces, they’re caricatures rather than actual people. What Villadsen does so well throughout this comic is taking the expected and presenting it in an unexpected way. We expect gunslingers, bar fights, and heroism in cowboy literature. Instead we have these caricatures of cowboy media presented in a way that highlights the ridiculousness of their existence. And when one of them is killed, their mantle is flipped and taken by a woman who witnesses the murder. She steals a horse and rides out of her small town to become the cowboy that she believes she could be before dying. And the cowboy whose horse she stole? His role becomes hers—the woman watching cowboys from a window and wishing she could do something more.

The medium works the best when it’s representing what’s in front of us in the way the artist views the world. Creators like Nickerson and Villadsen are important in comics since their visions are clear—their works create a deeper understanding of the world in a way that only they can represent.

Get excited. Get abstract.


Drew Barth (Episode 331) is a writer residing in Winter Park, FL. He received his MFA from the University of Central Florida. Right now, he’s worrying about his cat.

The Diaries of a Sozzled Scribbler #17

The Diaries of a Sozzled Scribbler #17

Transcribed by DMETRI KAKMI

15 September 2020

Hello, logophiles! It’s me, Mr Sozzled, your intrepid reporter from the borders of insanity, ringing in from a cave in the Khyber Pass.

You guessed it. I was run out of Australia—yet again—by imbeciles after my last daring column, which apparently encouraged the killing of ‘Woke’ people. When all I was going was putting out the garbage.

My amanuensis, Demented something-or-other, is with me. Can’t pronounce his surname even when I’m drunk, which is most of the time.

He’s here to help me compile my dictionary. It’s called The Dictionary of a Gadfly. Do you like the title? It’s a reference to Socrates’s gadfly ethnics.

Don’t know what I’m talking about? Look it up, you ignoramus.

According to Plato, Socrates pointed out that dissent, like the gadfly, is easy to swat, but the cost to society of silencing individuals who are irritating could be high. ‘If you kill a man like me,’ Socrates said, ‘you will injure yourselves more than you will injure me’, because his role was that of a gadfly, ‘to sting people and whip them into a fury, in the service of truth.’

Given that Socrates is in Hades (but you never know with Greeks; they live long) I will be your modern-day gadfly. Don’t whip out the Mortein yet. Hear me out first and make up your own mind.

—Okay, Damascus, are you ready with your Olivetti typewriter?

—It’s Dmetri. Not Demented, not Damascus. Dmetri!

—Yeah, yeah, whatever. One dago name is the same as another.

—Prig. And can I please have an Air Mac or something more modern?

—There’s nothing wrong with a typewriter. Your fingers need the exercise. Besides, there’s no electricity in this cave. I think Barack Obama slept here.

—You mean Osama Bin Laden.

—I know what I mean. Now type. The first word in my world-famous dictionary is:

ABUSE —Nowadays everyone has been ‘abused’, even if it was a half-hearted pinch on the arse, or a wolf whistle, thirty-five years ago. Apparently, they were so traumatised they never got over it. This feeds into the cult of victimhood and second-wave feminism’s belief that women are frail things in need of protection.

—You can’t say that.

—Why not?

—Because people will be offended.

—Who gives a rat’s? Last time I looked I still lived in a democracy.

—Pakistan ain’t no democracy.

—Yeah, yeah. Second word:

AMERICA—A basket case filled with serial killers, televangelists, rapists, racists, pornographers, drug lords, waiters who want to be actors, and reality TV stars who want to rule the world. On the brink of collapse. Even so it insists on being called the land of the free, without a hint of irony.

—I feel sick.

—What is it now? Did the chapati you had for breakfast disagree with your delicate stomach?

—If people read this, we will be trapped in Pakistan forever.

—I can think of worst places.

—Oh, yeah, where?

—Wellington. Third word:

BEAUTY—A male construct invented to oppress women. Where that leaves beautiful men, I don’t know.

—That’s better. No one can be offended by that.

—That’s what you think. Fourth word:

BLACKFACE—Further proof that white people want to be black.

—Oh, god! I want the day off. I really don’t feel well.

—Be quiet. Youre lucky you have a job. Fifth word:

CANCEL CULTURE—Practiced by shrieking harpies online who have taken a page out of Stalin and Mao’s respective books.

—Yep, migraine coming on.

—Next:

COCK—An instrument of oppression. Women fear it, straight men brandish it, and gays worship it.

—I like that one.

—You would, you poof.

—So are you.

—No, I’m not. I’m a pessimist. Next:

DONALD TRUMP—Absurdism and Dadaism in the White House.

—Hey, these are getting better.

—Told you. Next:

FEMALE SEXUALITY—Look but dont touch. Better yet dont even look.

—You jumped the E’s.

—Shut up. Next:

GAYS—Unnatural, despite the fact that heterosexuals continue to produce them. Must be accepted, unless you’re in the United Arab Emirates, in which case you toss them off a minaret to see if they float. If they hit the ground, they are not gay. If they float, they are gay because all gays are light on their feet.

—Oh god, my headache is coming back.

—Next:

GENDER NON-CONFORMING— A boring heterosexual who wants a slice of the queer pie so that he/she/they can appear unique and interesting.

—Keep ‘em innocuous, just like that.

—Next:

JAPAN—A retiring country that makes the world feel guilty about Hiroshima and Nagasaki, while never talking about the Nanjing massacres, prisoner of war camps, the Unit 731 experiments, cannibalism, and other atrocities in Asia Pacific during WWII.

—You can’t say that!

—Why not?

—Because they will set Sadako on us.

—Coward. Next:

MIA FARROW—A nut job who adopts children and screws them up, using techniques she learned in Rosemary’s Baby.

—Even I can’t argue with that one.

—Coming right up:

MUSLIMS—Fly airplanes that don’t land and love dressing up as Daleks.

—Do I need to remind you we are guests of the Taliban?

—They’ve got a sense of humour. Next:

WHITE PRIVILEGE—No such thing. A racist fabrication…

—That’s it. You’ve gone too far this time. I resign. I’m going to offer myself as a concubine to the first warlord I encounter. They can use my Khyber Pass all they like. But I am not going to facilitate your insane rants any more. Goodbye.

—Come back, you wretch. You can’t survive without me. Besides, no one wants to pluck your old cherry—even out here, where they’re all desperate. Come back, I tell you.

 À bientôt, mes amies.


The Sozzled Scribbler was born in the shadow of the Erechtheion in Athens, Greece, to an Egyptian street walker (his father) and a Greek bear wrestler (his mother). He has lived in Istanbul, Rome, London, New Orleans and is currently stateless. He partakes of four bottles of Bombay gin and nine packets of Gauloises cigarettes a day.

Dmetri Kakmi is a writer and editor. His first book, Mother Land, was shortlisted for the New South Wales Premiers Literary Awards in Australia, and his new book, The Door, will be released in September 2020.

Episode 437: Steve Davenport

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Episode 437 of The Drunken Odyssey, your favorite podcast about creative writing and literature is available on Apple podcasts, stitcher, spotify, or click here to stream (right click to download, if that’s your thing).

Steve Davenport

On this episode, I talk to poet Steve Davenport about poetry, collaboration, the body, and many other things.

TEXT DISCUSSED


NOTES

Scribophile

TDO Listeners can get 20% of a premium subscription to Scribophile. After using the above link to register for a basic account, go here while still logged in to upgrade the account with the discount.

Check out my literary adventure novel, Guy Psycho and the Ziggurat of Shame.


Episode 437 of The Drunken Odyssey, your favorite podcast about creative writing and literature is available on Apple podcasts, stitcher, spotify, or click here to stream (right click to download, if that’s your thing).